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Dennis Beverly
Dennis Beverly
Regular Programming
12:00am - 6:00am
National News

 

BURLINGTON, Vt. (AP) — Several states around the country are asking cybersecurity experts to re-examine state and utility networks after a Vermont utility's laptop was found to contain malware that U.S. officials say is linked to Russian hackers.

 

The Burlington Electric Department, one of Vermont's two largest electric utilities, confirmed Friday it had found on one of its laptops the malware code used in Grizzly Steppe, the name the U.S. government has given to malicious cyber activity by Russian civilian and military intelligence services.

 

A Burlington Electric Department spokesman says federal officials have told the company the threat was not unique to them.

 

A spokesman for the Department of Homeland Security would not say on Saturday whether any other utilities, organizations or entities had reported similar malware on their systems following the report. The official says any such information would be confidential.

 

Officials in New York, Rhode Island, Massachusetts and Connecticut said they are more closely monitoring state and utility networks for anything suspicious.

 

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