Ohio

95-year-old Ohio WWII Vet Gets Bronze Star, Other Overdue Medals

 

VAN WERT, Ohio (AP) — A 95-year-old World War II veteran in Ohio has received his combat medals that were mistakenly withheld.

 

U.S. Rep. Bob Latta presented a Bronze Star, a Purple Heart and other decorations to Orval Mullen on Wednesday, his birthday, at an American Legion hall in Van Wert.

 

Latta says Mullen earned the commendations for heroic actions in combat but never got them because of "a military oversight." Latta says he learned about that oversight last summer while interviewing Mullen for the Library of Congress Veterans' History Project and wanted to make sure the error was corrected.

 

Mullen received nearly a dozen medals or other honors in all.

 

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Costs May Go Up For Ohio license Plates, Driver's Licenses

 

COLUMBUS, Ohio (AP) — Ohio drivers may be paying more to get their license plate or driver's license under proposed changes to the state transportation budget.

 

One change proposed Tuesday by the Ohio House of Representatives Finance Committee would allow county commissioners to levy a new $5 fee for Ohio license plates. Money collected through the increase would be used to pay for transportation projects.

 

If approved, the proposal would increase the total base cost of a passenger car plate to $39.50, while the cost of a motorcycle plate would increase to $33.50.

 

Service fees paid to deputy registrars who run the Ohio Bureau of Motor Vehicles offices also would increase under the proposed changes to Gov. John Kasich's (KAY'-siks) two-year, $7.8 billion transportation budget. The service fees would rise from $3.50 to $5.25.

 

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Ohio bill would require teaching cursive writing in schools

 

COLUMBUS, Ohio (AP) — Some state lawmakers want to bring back cursive handwriting as a requirement in Ohio's elementary schools.

 

Republican Reps. Andrew Brenner and Marilyn Slaby have proposed legislation that would again make cursive instruction mandatory between kindergarten and fifth grade. Thirteen representatives have signed on as co-sponsors.

 

The bill would require schools to make sure students can write legibly in standard print by third grade and in cursive by the end of fifth grade.

 

The state doesn't currently require that cursive be taught in schools, and it's not part of the multi-state Common Core standards on which Ohio's standards are based. However, cursive instruction is included in the state's "model curriculum" for third and fourth grade.

 

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Court considers constitutionality of Ohio execution process

 

COLUMBUS, Ohio (AP) — A federal appeals court is hearing arguments over the constitutionality of Ohio's lethal injection process as the state tries to start carrying out executions once again.

 

State attorneys say they've provided plenty of evidence to show that the contested first drug in Ohio's three-drug method will put inmates into a deep state of unconsciousness.

 

The state also argues that the U.S. Supreme Court last year upheld the use of that drug, midazolam (mih-DAY'-zoh-lam), in a case out of Oklahoma.

 

Lawyers for death row inmates are challenging the effectiveness of midazolam.

 

The 6th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in Cincinnati scheduled arguments Tuesday.

 

Ohio is appealing a federal judge's decision that rejected the state's current three-drug execution method.

 

Ohio plans to execute condemned child killer Ronald Phillips on May 10.

 

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Fifty-five years after first orbit, Glenn still inspires

 

COLUMBUS, Ohio (AP) — John Glenn is continuing to inspire 55 years after becoming the first American to orbit Earth.

 

Since Glenn's death on Dec. 8 at the age of 95, devotees have visited an exhibit of his artifacts at Ohio State University, backers have begun fundraising for an observatory and astronomy park in Glenn's name and work has begun on a 7-foot statue in his likeness.

 

Glenn's storied life included time as a military test pilot and U.S. senator, but it was the history-making Mercury mission that propelled Glenn and his spacecraft Friendship 7 into the history books.

 

The anniversary of the flight is Monday.

 

During 4 hours, 55 minutes and 23 seconds on Feb. 20, 1962, the capsule circled the Earth three times, making Glenn the first American to orbit Earth.

 

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Contenders Crowd Potential 2018 Political Field in Ohio

 

COLUMBUS, Ohio (AP) — In the timeline of politics, Ohio's next statewide election is just around the corner.

 

For Republicans, that means working to avert a collision in 2018 among three high-profile gubernatorial hopefuls: Attorney General Mike DeWine, Secretary of State Jon Husted (HYOO'-sted) and Lt. Gov. Mary Taylor.

 

For out-of-power Democrats, the challenge is even trickier: Finding any candidate with the political clout and statewide name recognition to win.

 

Ex-Attorney General Richard Cordray would be among the Democrats' top possibilities should Republicans in Washington succeed in firing him as head of the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau. Talk-show host Jerry Springer also is considering a run. So are U.S. Rep. Tim Ryan, Ohio Supreme Court Justice Bill O'Neill, and former state Rep. Connie Pillich.

 

Republican Gov. John Kasich cannot run for re-election because of term limits.

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Teen Shot at West Liberty School Says Positive Attitude Helps Him Cope

 

WEST LIBERTY, Ohio (AP) — A 16-year-old boy who was shot at his Ohio school a month ago says he's "feeling pretty good" and is glad to be attending classes and other school activities as life gets back to normal.

 

West Liberty

 

The Springfield News-Sun reports that Logan Cole discussed his recovery in an interview this week with radio station WBLL in Bellefontaine (behl-FOWN'-tihn). He says keeping a positive, forgiving attitude is part of his coping strategy.

 

He was hospitalized and required surgery after the Jan. 20 attack at a high school in West Liberty.

 

Authorities say 17-year-old Ely Serna fired a 12-gauge shotgun. He is charged in juvenile court with attempted murder, felonious assault and other offenses. He has denied the charges.

 

A judge ordered a competency evaluation of Serna at his attorney's request.

 

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Ohio Board Approves Requirements for Tracking of Police Bias

 

COLUMBUS, Ohio (AP) — A police relations advisory board has approved a first-ever standard for Ohio law enforcement agencies for keeping racial and gender bias out of their interactions with the public.

 

Ohio Police Requirments

 

The standard approved Friday requires agencies to adopt policies prohibiting bias in traffic stops and when officers interact with individuals who aren't in vehicles, such as questioning suspects in a crime.

 

The standard also requires agencies to collect the race and gender of drivers stopped by police.

 

This is the seventh standard approved by the board commissioned by Gov. John Kasich (KAY'-sihk) after a series of fatal police shootings in Ohio and nationally.

 

Other standards cover deadly force, body cameras and recruiting and hiring.

 

The state will publish an annual list of agencies meeting the standards.

 

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Aviation hall keeps propeller signed by 1 of Wright brothers

 

WRIGHT-PATTERSON AIR FORCE BASE, Ohio (AP) — The president of the National Aviation Hall of Fame in Ohio says it considered selling a century-old wooden propeller signed by one of the Wright brothers but decided against it, at least for now.

 

Wright Brothers

 

The Dayton Daily News reports the 8 ½ foot spruce propeller from 1915 is the only known airplane artifact with the signature of one of the aviation pioneer siblings, Orville Wright.

 

It's thought to have been on a Wright-built float plane. It was bought for $37,000 and donated to the hall near Dayton in 2004, but more recently was appraised for at least $275,000.

 

It's not on display because the five-figure expense to conserve it for public view didn't fit the hall's business plans, so officials considered selling it for display at an aviation-related museum or site.

 

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The Latest: Daughter: No justice in cop father's shooting

 

COLUMBUS, Ohio (AP) — The daughter of a Columbus police officer wounded in a 1972 shooting says she can't agree with a judge's decision to dismiss the case against the suspect.

 

Lori Cooper says no one should be able to shoot a police officer and not suffer the consequences.

 

Franklin County Judge Guy Reece on Thursday rejected a prosecutor's request that the case against shooting suspect Charles Hays be reopened.

 

Reece says that on balance the evidence shows Hays' right to a speedy trial was violated by authorities' failure to bring him back to Ohio in the years after the shooting.

 

Franklin County Prosecutor Ron O'Brien said a decision hasn't been made whether to appeal.

 

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Fiat temporarily laying off 3,200 Jeep workers in Ohio

 

TOLEDO, Ohio (AP) — Fiat Chrysler says it will temporarily lay off about 3,200 workers at its assembly complex in Ohio as it shifts Jeep Cherokee production to Illinois.

 

Layoffs

 

The automaker is making the move to give its Toledo plant space to build a new version of the Jeep Wrangler. It also plans to add a new pickup truck to the plant's production lineup.

 

Fiat Chrysler says the temporary layoffs will start in April and extend for at least six months.

 

The company is spending $1 billion to retool its Toledo factory and to move the Jeep Cherokee line to a plant in Belvidere, Illinois.

 

About 5,000 now work at the Toledo assembly complex. The company has pledged that employment levels will not be affected by the changes.

 

 

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Police: Ohio officers fatally shoot knife-wielding suspect

 

COLUMBUS, Ohio (AP) — Police in central Ohio say officers fatally shot a man who confronted them with a knife and was suspected of earlier cutting a driver's neck and taking his car keys.

 

Columbus police say they went to a home in search of the suspect in the Tuesday night assault, and when he confronted them with a combat knife, a detective and officer repeatedly fired at him. He was hit multiple times and died at a hospital.

 

No officers were hurt.

 

Police said they would publicly identify the slain suspect after his family is notified.

 

Police say the man whose neck was cut suffered critical injuries and was being treated at a hospital. They say a woman who witnessed that attack and tried to intervene gave police the suspect's name.

 

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Woman Who Livestreamed Rape of Teen Gets 9 Months in Prison

 

COLUMBUS, Ohio (AP) — An Ohio woman accused of livestreaming images of a man raping a 17-year-old girl has been sentenced to nine months in prison.

 

Nineteen-year-old Marina Lonina was sentenced Monday in Columbus after pleading guilty to one count of obstructing justice under a deal with prosecutors. She initially faced other charges, including rape and pandering sexual matter involving a minor.

 

Authorities alleged that she used the social media app Periscope to livestream the assault last February.

 

Defense attorney Sam Shamansky tells The Columbus Dispatch that Lonina admitted to failing to report the rape or turn over her evidence afterward.

 

The 29-year-old rape suspect, Raymond Gates, pleaded guilty and was sentenced to nine years in prison.

 

The victim alleged that Lonina set up the rape. Shamansky calls that allegation "unmitigated nonsense."

 

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Man Accused in $70M Ponzi Scheme Pleads Guilty in Ohio

 

DAYTON, Ohio (AP) — A man accused of defrauding nearly 500 victims in what authorities describe as a $70 million Ponzi scheme has pleaded guilty in Ohio to federal charges including conspiracy to commit mail and wire fraud

Authorities say 55-year-old William Apostelos, formerly of Springboro in western Ohio, also pleaded guilty in U.S. District Court in Dayton to a charge of theft or embezzlement from an employee benefit plan.

 

Prosecutors say the scheme began in 2009 and continued at least five years.

 

Authorities say Apostelos operated and oversaw multiple purported investment and asset management companies in the Dayton area, receiving $70 million in investment funds. Court documents say Apostelos paid for personal luxuries with the money instead of making investments.

 

No sentencing date has been set for Apostelos, who pleaded guilty Friday.

 

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Ohio Moves Forward With Strategy to Combat Lake Erie's Algae

 

TOLEDO, Ohio (AP) — Ohio's government agencies will spend the next year looking closely at hotspots that are contributing to Lake Erie's algae blooms and developing a monitoring network.

 

The work is part of the state's strategy finalized this past week to attack the algae that has become an increasing threat to drinking water.

 

Michigan and the Canadian province of Ontario along with Ohio signed a deal in 2015 to make a 40 percent reduction over the next decade in the phosphorus runoff feeding the algae.

 

Ohio's plan calls for using the next year to identify priority watersheds and develop reduction targets for those areas that are the source of large amounts of phosphorus.

 

The state also will try to find ways to cut phosphorus discharges at 30 wastewater treatment plants in northwestern Ohio.

 

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Human remains found in woods near golf course in Ohio

 

COLUMBUS, Ohio (AP) — Human remains have been found in a wooded area near a golf course in central Ohio.

 

Perry Township police said Monday that the remains were discovered by two women who were walking a dog on Sunday morning in a wooded area near the Brookside Golf Course and Country Club in suburban Columbus. Township police Chief John Petrozzi says a human skull and a leg bone were found at the site.

 

Petrozzi says officers were notified around 10:30 a.m. Sunday. He says it appears that the remains had been there for some time. Forensic anthropologists will be needed to determine how long.

 

Petrozzi says it also is not clear how the person died.

 

The state Bureau of Criminal Investigation is assisting police in their investigation.

 

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Court to weigh sentence of lone woman on Ohio's Death Row

 

COLUMBUS, Ohio (AP) — The Ohio Supreme Court is again considering a challenge by the state's only condemned female killer of her death sentence.

 

The high court has twice sent the case of Donna Roberts back to Trumbull County court in northeastern Ohio for resentencing.

 

The 72-year-old Roberts was sentenced to death for a third time in 2014. The Supreme Court planned to hear her new appeal Tuesday.

 

In the past, the court said that a prosecutor improperly helped prepare a sentencing motion in Roberts' case and that a judge hadn't fully considered factors that could argue against a death sentence.

 

Roberts was accused of planning her ex-husband's murder with a boyfriend in hopes of collecting insurance money.

The boyfriend, Nathaniel Jackson, also was sentenced to death in the 2001 slaying.

 

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Ohio Police Investigate Arson Suspect's Links to Other Fires

 

LORAIN, Ohio (AP) - Authorities in northern Ohio say a woman's admission that she set a fire at her apartment building has spurred them to investigate whether evidence connects other home fires to her or her mother, who has a previous arson conviction.

 

Police in Elyria (eh-LEER'-ee-uh) say 32-year-old Trista Mussell said she set the Jan. 2 fire with a lighter and some paper because she was upset about her apartment being dirty and having cockroaches.

 

She was jailed on an aggravated arson charge. Her attorney, JD Tomlinson, told The Chronicle-Telegram that Mussell was waiting for a grand jury to consider the case.

 

Lorain Fire Marshal Matt Homolya says investigators believe they can link four more fires to Mussell and three to her mother since her mother's arson conviction in 2000.

 

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Killer in Cincinnati Stabbing Asks Parole Board for Mercy

 

COLUMBUS, Ohio (AP) - Attorneys for a death row inmate sentenced to die for fatally stabbing a 67-year-old man are asking the Ohio Parole Board for mercy for their client.

 

Raymond Tibbetts is scheduled for execution in April. He was convicted of killing Fred Hicks at Hicks' Cincinnati home in 1997.

 

The parole board meets Tuesday to hear arguments for and against clemency for Tibbetts.

 

Records show that Tibbetts first killed his wife, 42-year-old Judith Crawford, by beating her with a bat and stabbing her during an argument over Tibbetts' crack cocaine habit. Tibbetts then killed Hicks, who had hired Crawford as a caretaker and allowed the couple to stay with him.

 

Tibbetts was sentenced to death for the killing of Hicks and life imprisonment without parole for Crawford's death.

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Ohio Urging Police Agencies to Meet New Statewide Standards

 

COLUMBUS, Ohio (AP) — The state is urging Ohio law enforcement agencies to adopt new statewide standards governing the use of deadly force, body cameras, hiring and other policies ahead of a March deadline.

 

An advisory board commissioned by Gov. John Kasich created the standards after a series of fatal police shootings, including the 2014 death of 12-year-old Tamir Rice in Cleveland.

 

The state Department of Public Safety says more than 300 agencies employing just over half of all Ohio police officers have received certification or applied to participate to date.

 

Agencies must apply to adopt the standards as minimum policies soon or be listed as noncompliant on a list to be published in March.

 

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World's Oddest Creatures Coming to Akron Zoo for New Exhibit

 

AKRON, Ohio (AP) — The Akron Zoo is introducing a new exhibit this summer that showcases some of the planet's more peculiar species such as the naked mole rat and Venus flytraps.

 

Zoo officials announced Tuesday that the new Curious Creatures exhibit will open June 3 in the Komodo Kingdom Education Center, which previously housed the popular Journey to the Reef display.

 

The zoo's new inhabitants also include red-eyed tree frogs, walking batfish and electric eels as well as several carnivorous plants and more.

 

Doug Piekarz, the zoo's president and CEO, says Curious Creatures allows the preserve to engage guests in their exploration of biodiversity like never before.

 

The exhibit features more than 20 animal and plant displays, an interactive learning lab and a strength tester where guests can virtually challenge the mantis shrimp.

 

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6 people injured in explosion at coal-fired power station

 

ABERDEEN, Ohio (AP) — An explosion at an Ohio coal-fired power station has injured six people.

 

Operator Dayton Power & Light and Adams County Sheriff Kimmie Rogers say none of the injuries at the J.M. Stuart Generating Station power plant near Aberdeen is considered life-threatening.

 

A dispatcher with the sheriff's office says the explosion was reported Tuesday afternoon at the station, about 60 miles east of Cincinnati.

 

Dayton Power & Light says the plant was evacuated and preliminary reports accounted for all employees and contractors.

It's unclear if any of those injured had to be hospitalized.

 

The cause of the explosion is unknown.

 

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2 More Sentenced in String of Arsons Near Bowling Green Ohio

 

BOWLING GREEN, Ohio (AP) — Four people who prosecutors say were involved in a string of fires in northwestern Ohio have now been sentenced.

 

Three of the four will spend time in prison for the fires in rural parts of Wood County south of Toledo.

 

Investigators connected the group to five fires set last March. One of the suspects sentenced this past week received three years in prison while another was sentenced to probation.

 

Wood County Prosecutor Paul Dobson says one received leniency after cooperating with the investigation.

 

He says he isn't sure what role each played in the arsons that destroyed barns, at least two houses and other structures.

 

No one was hurt in the fires, but they did result in hundreds of thousands of dollars in damage.

 

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The Latest: Wisconsin student, her dad were on Missing Ohio Plane

 

CLEVELAND (AP) — The University of Wisconsin-Madison says one of its freshmen was among the six people aboard a small plane that disappeared over Lake Erie near Cleveland last week.

 

The university says 19-year-old Megan Casey, of Powell, Ohio, had been attending a Cleveland Cavaliers game with her father, Brian, and four neighbors. The university says the six were returning to Columbus when the plane vanished late Thursday shortly after takeoff.

 

So far there has been no sign of the plane or its occupants, though there have been multiple reports of debris washing ashore near the airport where the plane took off. Police say they have confirmed that a bag recovered Sunday was from the aircraft.

 

The university says Megan Casey was in a sorority and was pursuing a career in nursing.

 

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Observatory named for John Glenn proposed at Ohio state park

 

LOGAN, Ohio (AP) — Backers are fundraising to build an observatory and astronomy park named for the late space hero John Glenn at a state park in his native Ohio.

 

Members of the nonprofit Friends of Hocking Hills State Park say they've secured half of the $1.6 million budget for the proposed project at the park about 45 miles southeast of Columbus. They say the lack of light pollution in the area allows clear views of the night sky.

 

The head of the nonprofit group's board says in a statement that the park could offer research and education opportunities, help spark visitors' interest in science and astronomy and honor Glenn's legacy.

 

Glenn was the first American astronaut to orbit Earth and later became a U.S. senator. He died Dec. 8, at age 95.

 

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Ohio high-schooler, 16, saves herself, 3 brothers from fire

 

COLUMBUS, Ohio (AP) — An Ohio high-schooler is being credited with saving herself and her three younger brothers from a house fire.

 

The Columbus Dispatch reports that 16-year-old Abbi Swank's parents were delivering newspapers at around 4 a.m. Thursday when fire engulfed the north side house where she and her siblings were sleeping.

 

The Whetstone High School junior awoke to the sounds of her 11-year-old brother, Tyler, screaming. She smelled smoke, wrapped herself in a blanket and ran.

 

Abbi made sure Tyler and her 9-year-old brother, Bo, got outside. She was unable to rouse her 13-year-old brother, Kyle, so she dragged him out. Abbi then called her parents and 911.

 

Columbus fire officials said her actions probably saved all four children.

 

Two of the family's four dogs died in the blaze.

 

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Court Dismisses Appeal Over Sex Abuse of Adopted Marysville Girls

 

MARYSVILLE, Ohio (AP) — A court has dismissed an appeal by a former Ohio National Guardsman sentenced to life in prison for sexually abusing three adopted daughters.

 

An attorney for the 43-year-old Marysville man argued evidence didn't support the conviction, the man had ineffective legal counsel and the child witnesses recanted their accounts at some point.

 

The man denied abusing the girls. His wife testified she never saw signs of such abuse. She was sentenced to 18 months in prison for intimidation and obstructing justice.

 

The appeals court ruling issued last month dismissed the man's appeal because the case wasn't fully resolved at the county level, as the jury deadlocked on one charge that hadn't yet been retried or dismissed.

 

The Associated Press isn't naming the couple to protect the children's identities.

 

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Ohio Governor Gets 20-week Abortion Ban, Heartbeat Bills

 

COLUMBUS, Ohio (AP) — Two differing abortion bans have arrived at Ohio Gov. John Kasich's (KAY'-sikz) desk, and lobbying is intensifying for and against the measures.

 

One bill prohibits abortions after the 20-week mark, when proponents assert a fetus can feel pain. The second bars the procedure at the first detectable heartbeat, as early as six weeks into pregnancy.

 

The anti-abortion group Ohio Right to Life has asked the Republican governor to sign the 20-week ban and not to sign the heartbeat bill provisions. It calls a "pain-capable" ban the only "viable way forward" to sparking the legal challenge that could end abortion nationally.

 

The 16,000-member Ohio State Medical Association asked Kasich to veto both bills. The physicians' group says it doesn't take positions on abortion but opposes criminalizing a procedure that's part of standard care.

 

 

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Former Astronaut, US Sen. John Glenn of Ohio has Died at 95

 

Former astronaut and U.S. Sen. John Glenn has died in Ohio. He was 95.

 

 

Glenn became a national hero in 1962 when he became the first American to orbit the Earth.

 

Hank Wilson with the John Glenn School of Public Affairs says Glenn died Thursday afternoon at the James Cancer Hospital in Columbus.

 

Glenn was the third U.S. astronaut in space and the first of them to get into orbit. He circled the Earth three times. The Soviet Union had put a man into orbit a year earlier in 1961.

 

Glenn then spent 24 years as a Democrat from Ohio in the Senate and briefly made a run for president in 1984. He returned to space in 1998, at age 77, aboard space shuttle Discovery.

 

He was the last survivor of the original Mercury 7 astronauts.

 

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The Latest: Ohio Senate Committee Expands Concealed Guns Law

 

COLUMBUS, Ohio (AP) - The Latest on bills moving through the Legislature in its final 2016 sessions (all times local):

     4:45 p.m.

An Ohio Senate committee has approved a bill to expand the state's concealed weapons law to allow guns in places such as colleges and day cares and on private aircraft.

The bill still permits those places to ban guns if they want. It would keep a ban on concealed weapons in government buildings, unless an agency decides to allow them.

The Senate Government Oversight & Reform Committee approved the bill Wednesday, sending it onto the full Senate. The House passed the bill last year.

The Ohio Association of Chiefs of Police and the Ohio Prosecuting Attorneys Association oppose the bill. The Buckeye State Sheriffs' Association supports it.

The bill is sponsored by Republican Rep. Ron Maag (MAG) of Lebanon, in southwestern Ohio.

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4:30 p.m.

The Ohio House has approved a bill that would prohibit local municipalities from setting minimum wages higher than the state level.

 Republican backers say a patchwork of minimum wage laws would create an uncertain business environment that could hurt current companies and drive those considering Ohio to look at other states.

Democratic opponents say local communities should be allowed to set minimum wages above Ohio's current level of $8.10 to help workers.

 The bill was included in legislation overriding local ordinances that regulate pet stores, requiring them to purchase animals from shelters and rescue groups as opposed to buying them from high-volume breeders, which critics say are often puppy mills that treat animals poorly.

The legislation also includes bans on bestiality and a crackdown on cockfighting and "bearbaiting."

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1:35 p.m.

In the final days of their two-year session, Ohio lawmakers hope to vote on bills that would ban abortions after 20 weeks, permit concealed weapons in more places including day cares and outlaw puppy mills.

 

The 20-week ban would be added to legislation already on its way to Republican Gov. John Kasich that would prohibit abortions once a fetal heartbeat is detected.

House lawmakers heard testimony about the 20-week ban Wednesday morning with a scheduled committee vote in the afternoon and a goal to put it on the House floor later in the day.

Another bill would regulate pet stores and require them to purchase animals from shelters and rescue groups. Another measure would expand the state's concealed-weapons law to allow guns at places like day cares and colleges.

 

 

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UPDATED 4:30 PM - Ohio State Attacker Identified; Man of Somalian Descent

 

COLUMBUS, Ohio (AP) — The Latest on reports of an active shooter on the Ohio State University campus (all times local):

 

4:30 p.m.

 

Authorities say the officer who killed an attacker at Ohio State University was a university police officer who'd been on the job for less than two years.

 

Department of Public Safety Director Monica Moll identified the officer as 28-year-old Alan Horujko. She says he started on the Ohio State police force in January 2015.

 

Ohio State Police Chief Craig Stone says it was fortunate there was a nearby gas leak that the officer had gone to investigate. Stone says it helped position Horujko to respond to the attack so quickly.

 

Those injured in the attack included an Ohio State faculty member, four graduate students and three undergrads.

 

Authorities say they were able to get photos of the suspect's vehicle driving onto campus and confirmed only one person was in the car.

 

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4:10 p.m.

 

A director of public safety says a man who drove a car into pedestrians and began stabbing people at Ohio State was a student at the school.

 

Ohio State Department of Public Safety Director Monica Moll also identified the now-deceased suspect as Abdul Razak Ali Artan.

 

A U.S. official earlier told The Associated Press that he was born in Somalia and living in the United States as a legal permanent resident. The official wasn't authorized to publicly discuss details of the ongoing case and spoke to The Associated Press on condition of anonymity.

 

Authorities say Artan was shot to death by a police officer Monday morning shortly after he drove up onto a curb into pedestrians, got out of the car and began stabbing people with a butcher knife.

 

Nine people were injured, including one critically.

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3:20 p.m.

 

A U.S. official has identified the suspect in the Ohio State attack that injured nine people as a man of Somali descent.

 

The official identified Abdul Razak Ali Artan as the now-deceased suspect. He was born in Somalia and living in the United States as a legal permanent resident. It was unclear when Artan came to the U.S.

 

The official wasn't authorized to publicly discuss details of the ongoing case and spoke to The Associated Press on condition of anonymity.

 

A second law enforcement official confirmed that authorities believe the suspect's name is Abdul Artan. That official also wasn't authorized to publicly discuss details of the ongoing case and spoke on condition of anonymity.

 

Authorities say the suspect was shot to death Monday by a police officer after driving up onto a curb and into pedestrians and attacking people with a knife.

 

— Associated Press writers Alicia A. Caldwell and Eric Tucker in Washington contributed to this report.

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3 p.m.

 

A police chief says authorities are looking into whether the attack at Ohio State University was related to terrorism.

 

Columbus Police Chief Kim Jacobs was asked at a news conference Monday afternoon whether authorities were considering the possibility that it was a terror attack.

 

Jacobs says, "I think we have to consider that it is."

 

Authorities say a man purposely plowed his car over a curb and into pedestrians on Monday morning before jumping out of the car and attacking people with a butcher knife. A police officer who was nearby because of an earlier gas leak was on the scene in a minute and shot and killed the attacker.

 

The FBI and other agencies joined the investigation.

 

Authorities say nine people were hurt, one of them critically.

 

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1:50 p.m.

 

A witness to an attack at Ohio State University says he initially thought a car had driven over a curb into pedestrians accidentally but realized it was intentional when a man emerged with a butcher knife.

 

Student Martin Schneider says he saw the attack take place Monday morning.

 

He says he saw the attacker hit several people with the car, then emerge swinging the knife.

 

Schneider says the attacker didn't say anything.

 

He says he heard the car's engine revving before it hit the curb because it was going pretty fast. He says he also heard yells from a frightened crowd.

 

Ohio State Police Chief Craig Stone says an officer who was nearby because of an earlier gas leak shot and killed the attacker.

 

Nine people were taken to hospitals.

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1:20 p.m.

Authorities are now saying nine people were injured at Ohio State University when an attacker purposely drove over a curb and into pedestrians and then got out of the vehicle and began stabbing people with a butcher knife.

Ohio State Police Chief Craig Stone says eight of the victims are in stable condition and one victim is in critical condition after the attack Monday. Authorities said two people had been stabbed, four people had been hurt by a car and two others were treated for lacerations.

The injuries to the ninth person weren't immediately clear.

Earlier, hospital officials said that eight people had non-life-threatening injuries.

Stone says an officer who was nearby because of an earlier gas leak shot and killed the male suspect.

___

 

1:10 p.m.

 

Ohio State police say the attacker on campus purposely drove over a curb and into pedestrians and then got out of the vehicle and began stabbing people with a butcher knife.

 

Police Chief Craig Stone spoke early Monday afternoon at a news conference.

 

Authorities also said police believe that there was only one attacker. Ohio State said earlier that the suspect had been shot and killed. 9 non-life-threatening injuries reported aby Ohio State University officials.

 

The university had sent out a series of tweets at around 10 a.m. Monday saying there was an active shooter on campus and that shooters should run, hide or fight. About an hour and a half later, the university said a shelter-in-place warning had been lifted and the scene was secure.

 

Authorities said later that it doesn't appear that the suspect used a gun in the attack.

 

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12:50 p.m.

 

A spokesman for Ohio State University says a suspect in an attack on campus that injured at least eight people has been shot and killed.

 

Ben Johnson also said Monday that injuries in the attack included stab wounds and being struck by a vehicle.

 

A law enforcement official told The Associated Press that the suspect is believed to have initially struck people with a car before beginning to stab victims. There was no indication that the suspect shot anyone. The official wasn't authorized to discuss an ongoing investigation by name and spoke on condition of anonymity.

 

The details started to emerge after a morning of confusion and conflicting reports that began with the university issuing tweets warning students that there was an "active shooter" on campus near the engineering building and that they should "run, hide, fight."

 

12:15 p.m.

 

A spokesman for Ohio State University says a suspect in attack on campus has been shot and killed and injuries in the attack on campus included stab wounds and being struck by a vehicle.

 

Ben Johnson said Monday that there were also other injuries that were being evaluated.

 

He says campus will remain open, but classes will be canceled for the rest of the day.

 

The university had sent a series of tweets at around 10 a.m. Monday saying there was an active shooter on campus and that students should run, hide or fight. About an hour and a half later, the university said a shelter-in-place warning had been lifted and the scene was secure.

 

At least eight people have been sent to hospitals.

 

The fate of any suspect or suspects wasn't immediately clear.

 

12:05 p.m.

 

Hospital officials say eight patients they received from the scene of a reported attack at Ohio State University have non-life-threatening injuries.

 

The eight patients were split among OSU Wexner Medical Center, OhioHealth Grant Medical Center and OhioHealth Riverside Methodist Hospital.

 

The university had warned students in a series of tweets earlier Monday that there was an active shooter on campus and that they should run, hide or fight. About an hour and a half later, the university said a shelter-in-place warning had been lifted and the scene was secure.

 

The fire department had earlier said that seven people had been taken to hospitals.

 

It wasn't immediately clear if a suspect or suspects in the attack were among the people sent to the hospitals.

 

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11:35 a.m.

 

Ohio State University says a shelter-in-place warning has been lifted and the scene is secure following reports of an active shooter and at least seven people injured.

 

Ohio State tweeted Monday morning that all classes would be canceled for the rest of the day.

 

The university had warned students in a series of tweets earlier Monday that there was an active shooter on campus and that they should run, hide or fight.

 

The Columbus Fire Department says seven people had been taken to the hospital. It says two of those people were in stable condition. It didn't have details on the other five.

 

___

 

11:33 a.m.

 

Ohio State says shelter-in-place warning is lifted and scene is secure after active shooter report, injuries. All Ohio State Columbus classes have been canceled for today.

 

10:45 a.m.

 

The fire department says seven people have been sent to the hospital after an active shooter was reported at Ohio State University.

 

The Columbus Fire Department says two of those people are in stable condition. It had no information on the other five people.

 

Ohio State University warned students in a series of tweets Monday morning that there was an active shooter on campus and that they should run, hide or fight.

 

One tweet says: "Buckeye Alert: Active Shooter on campus. Run Hide Fight. Watts Hall. 19th and College." Watts Hall is a materials science and engineering building.

 

It is not immediately clear if the shooting is still in progress.

 

___

 

This story has been corrected to show that the fire department said seven people have been sent to the hospital after a report of an active shooter at Ohio State University, not that they said seven people have been sent to the hospital after a shooting at Ohio State University.

___

10:30 a.m.

 

Ohio State University is telling students there's an active shooter on campus and they should "Run Hide Fight."

 

Ohio State's official Twitter page retweeted a post from OSU Emergency Management saying there is an active shooter on campus in Columbus on Monday morning.

 

The tweet says: "Buckeye Alert: Active Shooter on campus. Run Hide Fight. Watts Hall. 19th and College." Watts Hall is a materials science and engineering building.

 

"Run, hide, fight" is standard protocol for active shooter situations. It means: Run, evacuate if possible; Hide, get silently out of view; or Fight, as a last resort, take action to disrupt or incapacitate the shooter if your life is in imminent danger.

 

A Columbus police dispatcher declined to comment on the reports, but police vehicles were seen at the scene.

 

 

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Wrong-way Driver Killed in Collision with Other Vehicles

 

COLUMBUS, Ohio (AP) — Police say a woman has died after driving the wrong way on a central Ohio street and hitting another vehicle head-on.

 

Columbus police say 60-year-old Bonita Allen, of Columbus, was killed while driving the wrong way on U.S. 23 early Monday. Police say Allen collided head-on with a sports utility vehicle, causing it to spin and hit a car in the same lane.

 

Police say two women in the SUV and a man in the car received treatment for non-life threatening injuries.

 

Allen was pronounced dead at the scene.

 

It was Columbus' 55th traffic fatality this year.

 

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Cleveland Airport Trying to Reduce Wait Times This Winter

 

CLEVELAND (AP) — Cleveland Hopkins International Airport is trying to reduce the length of time people must wait for planes on snowy days and have more planes arrive on time.

 

The (Cleveland) Plain Dealer reports Hopkins now has a team of more than 100 people operating 60 snow removal vehicles.

 

Hopkins used federal money to buy new equipment such as plows and ice removal machines. Officials say crews can now clear Hopkins' 11,000-foot runway in 20 minutes — twice as fast as before.

 

Hopkins officials have had discussions with counterparts at airports in Buffalo and Chicago that deal with lake effect snow to determine the best methods for snow removal.

 

The airport also is developing a system for removing snow from runways when fewer planes are flying.

 

 

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Feds: Barrier in Gorilla Exhibit Didn't Meet US Standards

 

CINCINNATI (AP) — A federal inspection has concluded that the Cincinnati Zoo's barrier to keep the public and gorillas separate wasn't in compliance with standards for housing primates the day a 3-year-old boy slipped into the gorilla exhibit and a gorilla named Harambe (huh-RAHM'-bay) was fatally shot.

 

The inspection report states that the zoo's dangerous-animal response team properly followed procedures after zoo visitors called 911 on May 28 to report a child in the gorilla enclosure. A team member concluded the child was in "life-threatening danger." The gorilla was killed to save the boy's life.

 

The zoo quickly made the barrier taller and used nylon mesh to close any gaps. It says there had been no earlier issues with the barriers, which were found compliant in earlier federal inspections, including in April.

 

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Protest of oil pipeline blocks traffic in downtown Ohio city

 

COLUMBUS, Ohio (AP) — Columbus police report an activist in a small group protesting construction of the Dakota Access oil pipeline blocked traffic by handcuffing himself under a vehicle at a downtown intersection in the central Ohio city.

 

WCMH-TV reports other protesters chanted slogans like "water is life" as police and firefighters worked to remove the man from the minivan Monday. They used a saw to free him. Officers said the protester was facing various misdemeanor charges.

 

The Columbus Dispatch reports a group called Appalachia Resist said in a news release that the demonstration was part of a nationwide protest of the pipeline. The $3.8 billion pipeline is to carry crude oil from North Dakota to terminals in Illinois.

 

Native Americans and environmentalists say it will threaten water supplies and harm sacred tribal land.

 

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New Graduation Rules Tied to Tests Worry Ohio School Leaders

 

COLUMBUS, Ohio (AP) — Public school superintendents from around Ohio are raising concerns that a large number of high schoolers are in jeopardy of not graduating as expected next school year because of new requirements tied to more demanding tests.

 

Some of those administrators and other supporters rallied Tuesday outside the Statehouse as the state school board discusses potential changes to address the issue. Several superintendents addressing the crowd urged supporters to keep the conversation going with lawmakers and board members to bring about change.

 

Superintendents from some districts estimate one-third or more of their current juniors are at risk of not graduating next year. The class of 2018 is the first one subject to the new rules, which are tied to end-of-course exams that are more demanding than the old Ohio Graduation Tests.

 

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Driver exchanges gunfire with Ohio police, dies after crash

 

DELAWARE, Ohio (AP) — One person has died after a car chase involving gunfire ended in a crash near Columbus.

Authorities say officers exchanged shots with the driver before the crash Monday night in Delaware County.

 

It's not clear yet whether the driver died from the crash or the shots fired at the car.

 

State troopers say the chase stated in Marion County after the driver refused to stop on U.S. Route 23 and drove south at high speeds.

 

Delaware County sheriff's officers then used a device to puncture the car's tires. The driver kept going but later crashed into a pole near the city of Delaware.

 

Authorities surrounded the car and found the driver dead inside.

 

The driver's name hasn't been released.

 

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Ohio Mom Charged After Young Son Drinks Vodka From Sippy Cup

 

CONNEAUT, Ohio (AP) - An Ohio woman has been charged with child endangerment after she sneaked a sippy cup of vodka into a high school football game and her toddler son drank from it and became ill.

Thirty-year-old Andrea Mucciarone pleaded not guilty to the misdemeanor charge Tuesday in Conneaut (KAW'-nee-awt) Municipal Court.

The public defender assigned to represent Mucciarone said Wednesday he had no comment.

Police say Mucciarone brought the sippy cup and her 23-month-old son to a Conneaut High School football game Oct. 28 and a relative later noticed something wrong with the boy when he couldn't stand up. Police were called to a hospital where the toddler was treated.

Conneaut's police chief says the toddler has been placed in the custody of a relative.

Conneaut is about 70 miles east of Cleveland.

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Ohio man pleads guilty to hate crime in attack on black man

 

TOLEDO, Ohio (AP) - A white man in Ohio has pleaded guilty to a federal hate crime charge after saying in court that he and another man beat a stranger because he was black.

Prosecutors say Charles Butler, of Toledo, wrote about the attack on Facebook, saying it was "in the name of the white race."

The 33-year-old Butler pleaded guilty Wednesday in federal court.

The FBI says Butler and another Toledo man drove past the victim in May while he was unloading his truck and then returned and attacked him while yelling racial slurs.

Authorities say the man's eye was damaged and a bone in his eye socket was fractured. Police say two off-duty state troopers happened by and pulled the attackers away.

A second man still faces a federal hate crime charge.

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Ohioan who beat wife's drug supplier with bat gets probation

 

COLUMBUS, Ohio (AP) — A man convicted of beating his wife's heroin supplier with a baseball bat has been sentenced to probation by an Ohio judge who noted extensive support for the defendant from a community fed up with drug problems.

 

The Columbus Dispatch reports Edwin Sobony II could have faced eight years in prison but was sentenced Wednesday to two years of probation for felonious assault.

 

Franklin County Judge Charles Schneider said he doesn't support "vigilante justice" but concluded that Sobony is unlikely to re-offend. Schneider said he received lots of letters in support of Sobony before sentencing and people offered to pay Sobony's legal bills.

 

The 38-year-old apologized in court for the December beating, which left the alleged supplier with skull fractures. Sobony says he was trying to protect his family.

 

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Dehumidifiers Recalled Due To Fire and Burn Hazards; $4.8 Million in Property Damage Reported

 

The U.S. Consumer Product and Safety Administration issued a recall Wednesday for Midea made dehumidifiers that can overheat, smoke and catch fire, posing serious fire and burn hazards. The recall involves about 3.4 million (in addition 850,000 were sold in Canada) units sold over a 10 year period. Dehumidifiers should be unplugged immediately.

 

Midea

 

This recall involves 25, 30, 40, 50, 60, 65, 70, and 75-pint dehumidifiers with the following  brand names: Airworks, Alen, Arcticaire, Arctic King, Beaumark, Coolworks, ComfortAire, Comfort Star, Continental Electic, Crosley, Daewoo, Danby, Danby & Designer, Dayton, Degree, Diplomat, Edgestar, Excell, Fellini, Forest Air, Frigidaire, GE, Grunaire, Hanover, Honeywell, Homestyles, Hyundai, Ideal Air, Kenmore, Keystone, Kul, Midea, Nantucket, Ocean Breeze, Pelonis, Perfect Aire, Perfect Home, Polar Wind, Premiere, Professional Series, Royal Sovereign, Simplicity, Sunbeam, SPT, Sylvania, TGM, Touch Point, Trutemp, Uberhaus, Westpointe, Winix, and Winixl.
 
The brand name, model number, pint capacity and manufacture date are printed on the nameplate sticker on the back of the dehumidifier. To determine if your dehumidifier has been recalled, enter the model number at https://www.recallrtr.com/dehumidifier.
 
The dehumidifiers were sold at a number of retail locations including Lowes, Menards, PC Richard and other stores nationwide from January 2003 through December 2013 for between $100 and $300.
 
So far the chinese company Mides has received 38 reports of smoke and fire. About $4.8 million property damage has been reported. With no injuries have been reported.
 
Consumers should immediately turn off and unplug the dehumidifiers and contact GD Midea for either a replacement unit or a partial refund. Consumers whose dehumidifiers were manufactured before October 1, 2008 will receive a partial refund, not a replacement. The manufacturing dates can be found on back of units.
 
 
 

 

 

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Ohio court to hear appeal of killer who stabbed bartender

 

COLUMBUS, Ohio (AP) — The Ohio Supreme Court has scheduled a January hearing for a killer sentenced to die for raping and fatally stabbing a bartender.

 

A judge in 2012 ordered Joseph Thomas to be put to death for the slaying of Annie McSween in Lake County two years earlier.

 

Prosecutors said Thomas attacked the 49-year-old McSween by her car after she asked him to leave the bar where she worked.

 

The court on Wednesday set oral arguments for Jan. 10 to hear the appeal from attorneys for the 32-year-old Thomas.

 

Thomas' execution is likely years away even if the court upholds the sentence because of federal appeals and the state's difficulty finding execution drugs.

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Body linked to man suspected of killing women is identified

 

ASHLAND, Ohio (AP) — Authorities in Ohio have identified the remains of a woman whose death has been connected to a man suspected in the killings of at least three other women.

 

 

A coroner identified the woman whose body was found in September near Mansfield as Candice Cunningham. Media reports say she had been living with Shawn Grate this past summer.

 

Grate has been charged in the deaths of two women whose bodies were found in a house thought to be vacant in Ashland. He has been jailed since September.

 

Authorities say that following his arrest, Grate confessed to killing two other women, including Cunningham. He hasn't been charged in those two deaths.

 

His attorneys haven't returned phone calls seeking comment.

 

The identity of a fourth woman linked to Grate still hasn't been determined.

 

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Conference highlights drug abuse epidemic's effects on kids

 

CINCINNATI (AP) — A Cincinnati Children's Hospital doctor who works with newborns addicted to heroin says the opiate epidemic is harming children born addicted and creating chaos for older kids who can't have normal childhoods because of their parents' drug problems.

 

Dr. Kathy Wedig says the epidemic affects society overall because of the cost of treating and helping such children.

 

Wedig spoke Tuesday at a Cincinnati conference addressing the epidemic's effects on children. The event drew hundreds of doctors, nurses, social workers and addiction specialists.

 

The Public Children Services Association of Ohio says the number of children taken into custody has risen 19 percent over the past seven years, largely due to parents' painkiller and heroin addictions. The group says placing addicts' children in protective custody is costing taxpayers $45 million annually.

 

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Medical marijuana advisory panel gets to work in Ohio

 

COLUMBUS, Ohio (AP) — Ohio's new medical marijuana advisory committee is getting to work.

 

The 14-member panel is charged with coming up with recommendations on how medicinal cannabis will be grown, packaged, distributed and regulated. It was holding its first meeting Tuesday in Columbus.

 

A law that took effect Sept. 8 created the Medical Marijuana Advisory Committee. The law gave the state a year to put the program in place.

 

The panel includes appointees of Republican Gov. John Kasich (KAY'-sik) and legislative leaders of both parties. Representatives include pharmacists, physicians, a nurse, a patient advocate, a caregiver, a farmer, a county sheriff, the political director for a labor union, an employer and a college professor.

 

Appointees from the Drug Free Action Alliance, which opposed medical marijuana, represent mental-health and drug-addiction professionals.

 

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Historic Cincinnati Murals on Display in New Home Downtown

 

CINCINNATI (AP) — Nine colorful glass mosaic murals can be viewed any time at their new home in southwest Ohio.

 

Cincinnati's murals are now on display in protective cases on an exterior wall at the downtown convention center, with the display officially dedicated Thursday. The 1933 murals by art deco artist Winold Reiss depict Cincinnati manufacturing history, showing workers at companies such as Procter & Gamble and Cincinnati Milling.

 

The artwork was originally in the Union Terminal train concourse, but was moved in 1973 to the Cincinnati/Northern Kentucky International Airport before the train concourse was razed. They had to move again because of airport terminal demolition plans.

 

The light-reflecting mosaics were made from small glass pieces and tinted mortar. Each is some 20 feet tall by 20 feet wide and weighs 8 tons.

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Official: 139 Animals Seized From Ohio 'Farmyard of Horrors'

 

FAYETTEVILLE, Ohio (AP) — Officials say they've seized more than 130 animals from a home in a southwest Ohio village in a case they're calling a "farmyard of horrors."

 

Barb Ashmore, who is the deputy dog warden for the Brown County Animal Shelter, told WXIX-TV on Monday that 139 animals were removed from the backyard of a Fayetteville (FAY'uht-vil) home, including dogs, goats, chickens, sheep and rabbits.

 

Ashmore says some animals were found dead and that others were barely alive due to the filthy conditions and lack of space to move around.

 

The animals were seized following an odor complaint.

 

Ashmore says the homeowner, who isn't currently facing charges, told officials he was going to try to feed his family on the animals.

 

An investigation is ongoing.

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The Latest: NTSB: Passenger safety not ensured in Ohio crash

 

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Latest on a National Transportation Safety Board hearing on a 2015 corporate jet crash in Akron. (all times local):

 

12:25 p.m.

The National Transportation Safety Board has concluded pilot error during approach to an Ohio airport caused the fiery crash that killed two pilots and seven passengers aboard a corporate jet last year.

 

The board voted Tuesday to also affix blame to the Fort Lauderdale, Florida, aviation company that operated the jet for inadequate pilot training and aircraft maintenance, and the Federal Aviation Administration for failing to provide proper oversight of the company.

 

The NTSB investigation concluded the pilot attempting to land the jet last November caused an aerodynamic stall by improperly setting the plane's flaps and failing to maintain proper speed on approach to the Akron airport.

 

The plane carrying seven employees of a Boca Raton, Florida, company crashed into an apartment building less than two miles from the airport.

 

___

10:30 a.m.

The chairman of the National Transportation Safety Board says the flight crew of a corporate jet that crashed last year on approach to an Ohio airport, their employer and the Federal Aviation Administration "fell short" in ensuring the safety of the seven passengers killed in the fiery crash.

 

During a hearing Tuesday in Washington to decide what caused the crash, NTSB Chairman Christopher Hart said the investigation of the November 2015 crash outside Akron Fulton International Airport showed disregarded procedures leading up to the crash read like "pages from a basic text for preventing accidents."

 

The 10-passenger jet dove into an apartment building less than 2 miles from the airport. No one on the ground was injured.

 

Hart said in an opening statement that the pilots failed to use required checklists and used an improper and "unstabilized" approach as they neared the airport.

___

 

12:30 a.m.

Federal investigators are set to decide the probable cause for a corporate jet crash that killed nine people on approach to an Ohio airport last November.

 

The National Transportation Safety Board is scheduled to meet on Tuesday in Washington.

 

The jet crashed less than two miles from the runway at Akron Fulton International Airport. Surveillance video from a nearby business shows the jet descending at a high rate of speed over trees before crashing into an apartment building and exploding.

 

No one on the ground was injured.

 

The two pilots were killed, along with seven employees of a commercial real estate company based in Boca Raton, Florida.

 

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6 officers fired over 137-shot barrage seek to get jobs back

 

CLEVELAND (AP) — Six former Cleveland police officers are trying to get their jobs back after being fired following a high-speed chase and deadly shooting that led to changes at the department.

 

The November 2012 chase began when officers mistook the sound of a backfiring vehicle for a gunshot. It ended in a 137-shot barrage that killed two unarmed black people in East Cleveland.

 

Cleveland.com reports the arbitration process includes patrolman Michael Brelo, the only officer charged with a felony in the case. He was acquitted of manslaughter charges for firing the last 15 shots.

 

Thirteen officers fired shots. Six officers, including Brelo, were fired in January. A seventh officer retired before facing discipline.

 

The police union president vowed to fight the discipline and has described the firings as unprecedented and politically motivated.

 

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Bill Allows Ohio Casino Regulators to Oversee Fantasy Games

 

COLUMBUS, Ohio (AP) — An Ohio lawmaker has proposed giving state casino regulators authority over fantasy football leagues, office March Madness pools and similar games to ensure they aren't operated for profit.

 

The Blade of Toledo reports Republican state Senator Bill Coley's bill would put the state Casino Control Commission in charge of regulating the operators of pools and fantasy leagues.

 

Failing to pay out every penny of the entry fees in prizes would remain a crime under the bill. For-profit pools and internet gambling are already illegal in the state.

 

Coley says additional oversight ensures pools and raffles continue to operate legally.

 

Business interests behind pools could continue to use them as promotions to draw business under the bill. They also could collect profits on advertising and sponsorships related to the games.

 

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Northern Ohio sheriff Asks for More Space in Jail

 

BOWLING GREEN, Ohio (AP) — A sheriff in northern Ohio says the county jail's booking and medical areas are often overcrowded and that more space is needed.

 

The sheriff in Wood County says the area is being filled with inmates who are detoxing from opiates, suffering from mental health issues or on suicide watch.

 

Wood County Sheriff Mark Wasylyshyn (VAH'-suh-lish-in) says the booking area is being used as a medical unit and that the jail's holding cells often can't be used to house disruptive inmates.

 

Wood County commissioners are considering long-term planning.

 

The sheriff hopes to expand that section of the jail in Bowling Green.

 

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Rare LeBron James Rookie Card Could Fetch $200K at Auction

 

AKRON, Ohio (AP) — A rare LeBron James autographed rookie card is up for auction and could fetch up to $200,000.

 

The Akron Beacon Journal reports just eight bidders had vied as of Friday for what's being billed as the world's rarest and most valuable James basketball trading card. The leading bid of $85,000 was expected to grow before the auction closed Saturday.

 

The one-of-a-kind card from Upper Deck's 2003/04 Ultimate Collection series features a picture of the Cleveland Cavalier taking a shot, along with a swath of the NBA logo from his game uniform. It was randomly placed into a pack of cards.

 

Officials at New Jersey-based Goldin Auctions haven't disclosed the identity of the seller but say the card will be sold as the minimum $50,000 bid has been met.

 

 

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Woman Wins Rural Ohio Bowling Alley's $3.4M Raffle Jackpot

 

GARRETTSVILLE, Ohio (AP) — Organizers of a rural Ohio bowling alley's weekly raffle that has drawn huge crowds in recent weeks say a woman has won more than $3 million.

 

SkyLane Bowling owner Aaron King says a Mantua woman won the Queen of Hearts drawing Sunday. The winner wasn't present at the Garrettsville bowling alley but will receive the full prize — 90 percent of the $3.4 million jackpot.

 

About 15,000 people showed up for the drawing last week, prompting organizers in the Cleveland suburb to change the rules so the winner didn't have to be present to receive the full winnings.

 

The drawing cost $5 a ticket. Players hope to guess which slot on a board of cards holds the namesake card.

 

King says about 5,000 people attended Sunday's drawing.

 

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UPDATE: Ohio Sheriff: Search Turns Up No Sign of Ultralight Crash

 

UPDATE: Ohio sheriff: Search turns up no sign of ultralight crash

 

URBANA, Ohio (AP) — A sheriff in western Ohio says crews who searched through cornfields after getting a report of an ultralight crash found no evidence of a wreck.

 

Champaign County Sheriff Matthew Melvin said Sunday that it appears there never was a crash. He says search crews looked over the area Saturday on the ground and by air.

 

He says no wreckage was found and that there are no missing person reports from any of the airports nearby.

 

The sheriff says a witness who lives nearby had called authorities to report that he thought he saw an ultralight go down north of Urbana.

 

Melvin says the only thing they found in the fields were a few birthday balloons.

 

Sunday 2:11AM

 

Authorities say an ultralight glider has crashed in Salem Township and the operator has not been found.

 

The Champaign County Sheriff's Office says the crash was reported around 3:40 p.m. Saturday in an area between Bellefontaine and Urbana. WHIO-TV reports that a search conducted by a drone and another ultralight glider failed to locate the operator.

 

The search for the operator of an ultralight glider that crashed Saturday was called off in the evening.

The crash was reported in the 2000 block of Kennard-Kingscreek Road in Salem Twp., but this evening there were no authorities on scene and it wasn’t known where the aircraft was taken.

 

An investigation is continuing.

 

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Driver of Ohio Ambulance Struck by SUV Dies

 

CLYDE, Ohio (AP) — Authorities say an ambulance driver has died after an SUV went through a stop sign and struck the ambulance.

 

The State Highway Patrol reports that 45-year-old Sandra L. Cline, of Holland, died Friday at a hospital in Toledo where she was taken after the Thursday night crash.

 

The patrol says the SUV driver and two passengers in the ambulance, including a patient, were taken to area hospitals with non-life-threatening injuries.

 

The patrol says a Bloomfield Hills, Michigan, man was driving his SUV on a Sandusky County road in Green Creek Township when he went through a stop sign and hit the ambulance. The force of the crash caused the ambulance to overturn.

 

The crash remains under investigation.

 

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'Don King Way' Won't Move to Street Where he Killed a Man

 

CLEVELAND (AP) — Cleveland's city council won't further consider a proposal to put Don King's name on the street where the legendary boxing promoter stomped a man to death in 1966.

 

Don King

 

The honorary "Don King Way" already exists in Cleveland, on a segment of a boulevard near the newspaper he owns.

 

Two council members proposed moving the honorary street name to an avenue where King killed an employee.

 

Cleveland.com reports the council president determined the proposal won't move forward.

 

King says he doesn't care whether "Don King Way" is moved.

 

King says he's felt contrition for killing the man, Sam Garrett, who he says had jumped on his back. King spent almost four years in prison for the killing and was later pardoned by former Ohio Gov. Jim Rhodes.

 

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Ohio Elections Chief Wrongly Purged Voters According to Appeals Court

 

COLUMBUS, Ohio (AP) — Ohio's process for maintaining its voter rolls wrongfully removes eligible people, a federal appeals court ruled Friday as the perennial presidential battleground state prepares for the fall election.

 

The American Civil Liberties Union of Ohio and the New York-based public advocacy group Demos sued Republican Secretary of State Jon Husted in April, claiming the state illegally drops registered voters from its registration list based on their failure to vote in recent elections.

 

The 6th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in Cincinnati found Ohio's process violates federal law. One judge on the court's three-judge panel concurred in part, and dissented in part.

 

The decision sends the case back to the lower court, which must establish a process for either restoring purged voters to the rolls or allowing them to vote provisionally and having all those votes count.

 

In a statement, Husted said he awaits a "workable remedy" from the district court.

 

"To that end, if the final resolution requires us to reinstate voting eligibility to individuals who have died or moved out of Ohio, we will appeal," he said.

 

The ACLU's Mike Brickner said time is of the essence, with the general election less than seven weeks away and early voting beginning even sooner.

 

"It's important that we have some finality here, so that poll workers, voters and election officials all know what the rules are in advance of Election Day," he said.

 

It wasn't clear exactly how many voters have been affected by the purge process, but estimates are tens to hundreds of thousands.

 

Voters can check their registration online. The state's deadline to register, re-register or update an address is Oct. 11.

Husted says the appeals court ruling overturns 20 years of practice carried out by the last four elections chiefs.

 

The state's attorneys had argued that other states "use processes like, or more expansive than, Ohio's." In an appeals court in a brief, they noted methods in Indiana, Missouri, Tennessee and Montana.

 

The 6th Circuit sided with the groups' allegations that the state's maintenance of the voter rolls "has led to, and threatens to continue to result in, the disenfranchisement of eligible Ohio voters."

 

Judge Eugene E. Siler Jr., wrote in a separate opinion that he finds Ohio's procedure lawful, noting the state's removal process includes other factors such as failure to respond to address-confirmation notices.

 

The groups' lawsuit had claimed that Husted "has cancelled the registrations of voters in part because of their failure to respond to a notice mailed to their registered address, including notices sent to homeless voters who frequently cannot receive mail reliably."

 

Last year in Democrat-leaning Cuyahoga County, home to Cleveland, about 40,000 individuals were illegally purged from voter rolls for choosing not to vote, with a disproportionate number from poor and minority neighborhoods, according to the Ohio chapter of the A. Philip Randolph Institute, a labor group representing minorities.

 

A federal judge rejected the groups' complaint in June after finding their claims lacked merit.

 

The Justice Department had urged the appeals court to reverse the district judge's decision.

 

In a July brief, the department said federal law requires a voter's removal when the voter becomes ineligible because of a change of residence, but only after the state confirms the move.

 

 

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Another Fraternity Suspended for Hazing at Ohio's Miami U

 

OXFORD, Ohio (AP) — Miami University in Ohio has suspended another fraternity after investigating allegations of hazing.

 

Miami U

 

School officials say the Zeta Beta Tau fraternity is suspended through May 2018.

 

The school had suspended two other fraternities earlier this year for hazing and alcohol-related violations. At least nine such organizations at the Oxford campus are currently suspended.

 

Miami spokesman Claire Wagner tells the Hamilton-Middletown Journal-News the school has more than 50 fraternity and sorority chapters overall, and most of the participants are focused on values such as scholarship, service and leadership.

 

The Cincinnati Enquirer reports over one-third of the school's undergraduates are in fraternities or sororities, making the conduct of those organizations an important campus issue.

 

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Woman Admits Assisted Living Home Thefts, Posing as Nurse

 

DELAWARE, Ohio (AP) — A central Ohio woman has admitted under a plea deal that she stole jewelry, watches and other items from residents of senior living facilities over several years to support her drug habit.

 

Gwynne

 

Susan Gwynne pleaded guilty on Wednesday in Delaware to 46 of the 101 charges originally brought against her, including burglary, theft and receiving stolen property.

 

Gwynne told the judge she began stealing items from patients' rooms to support her cocaine habit while working as a nurse at an assisted living facility in 2004.

 

The 55-year-old Columbus woman says she was later fired, but continued to go to facilities in Delaware County and Franklin County in her uniform and stealing from rooms.

 

Investigators found more than 3,000 items at her home in March.

 

Gwynne's sentencing is scheduled for November.

 

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Court OKs Rule That Lets Ohio Attorneys Advise on Pot Law

 

COLUMBUS, Ohio (AP) — The Ohio Supreme Court has adopted a rule change to let attorneys counsel clients seeking to comply with the state's new medical marijuana law.

 

The high court says the amendment adopted Tuesday allows attorneys to help clients navigate the law, what it permits and how it's implemented. It also says lawyers in such circumstances should advise clients regarding related federal law.

 

The change comes after the court's professional conduct board said attorneys can't ethically provide services to people setting up medical marijuana-related businesses because of federal prohibitions on the drug. Using, growing and selling marijuana remains a federal crime.

 

Ohio's medical marijuana law took effect Sept. 8 but won't be fully operational for two years.

 

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524k Ohio absentee ballots requested, 40k more than 2012

 

COLUMBUS, Ohio (AP) — State officials say more than 524,000 absentee ballots have been requested in Ohio this year — an increase of 40,000 compared to the same period during the 2012 presidential election.

 

Secretary of State Jon Husted says nearly 12,000 of the absentee ballot applications are from military and overseas voters. The rest are from in-state residents.

 

Absentee ballot applications must be submitted by Nov. 5, the weekend before the Nov. 8 general election. Husted says voters should submit them as soon as possible.

 

Requests can be made online through MyOhioVote.com.

 

Completed absentee ballots must be postmarked by Nov. 7 and arrive at the county boards of elections offices within 10 days after the election.

 

The state says a record 1.87 million absentee ballots were cast in 2012.

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52,000 students participate in Ohio college credit program

 

COLUMBUS, Ohio (AP) — The state says more than 52,000 students participated during the first full year of a statewide program that allows Ohio middle- and high-schoolers to earn free college credit.

 

The Ohio Department of Higher Education announced inaugural College Credit Plus results Monday.

 

The department says nearly 15 percent of Ohio high school juniors and seniors participated in the program. Ninety percent of participants got the passing grade necessary to earn college credit.

 

The department estimates families saved $110 million in future college tuition through the program. Students' home districts pick up the tab for most of that cost.

 

Two-thirds of participants took courses at a community college. Another 22 percent attended a public university. The remaining 12 percent studied at an independent or private college. Most took core subjects.

 

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Police Officer Meets Ohio Man he Saved Nearly 20 Years Ago

 

COLUMBUS, Ohio (AP) — A Columbus police officer was taken by surprise when he met an Ohio man he saved from drowning nearly 20 years ago.

 

The Columbus Dispatch reports that both Christopher Jones and officer James Poole were overcome with emotion Friday when they met for the first time since the 1997 incident.

 

Ohio

 

The 24-year-old Jones says he had commented on the police division's Facebook page after he saw a photo of Poole. Jones recognized his name as the officer who pulled him from a swimming pool when he was 5 years old.

 

He was then contacted by the division to organize a surprise reunion. Jones had his 5-year-old daughter with him when he met Poole.

 

Poole says he never thought he'd be thanked years later.

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More Funding Sought for Post-9/11 Veterans Memorial in Ohio

 

SUNBURY, Ohio (AP) — The father of a Gold Star veteran who died in combat after the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks is working with others to secure permanent funding for an Ohio memorial dedicated to the fallen soldiers.

 

Ohio Memorial

 

Jim Bernholtz and other Gold Star parents and veterans groups helped create the Ohio Fallen Heroes Memorial in Sunbury in 2005 to remember those who've died since 9/11.

 

The Columbus Dispatch reports that Bernholtz and others worry that the privately funded site could fall into disrepair.

 

Bernholtz, the president of nonprofit Ohio Fallen Heroes Memorial, is seeking support to set up a legacy trust fund.

 

They are trying to raise as much as $1 million, the interest from which would support the memorial's annual $25,000 maintenance costs and about $600 to install each new marker.

 

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Polar Bear Cub on Display for Final Weekend at Ohio Zoo


POWELL, Ohio (AP) — Monday is the last day visitors to an Ohio zoo can see a female polar bear cub born there and hand-reared by staff before she relocates.

 

The Columbus Zoo and Aquarium announced earlier this year that Nora will join a female bear named Tasul (TAWS'-uhl) at the Oregon Zoo this fall. Now 10 months old and about 170 pounds, she'll spend a period in quarantine before being moved.

 

Officials say the move was approved so the zoo environment is positive for more cubs to be born if other bears become pregnant. They say would-be mother bears need quiet, which would be impossible with Nora's habitat-sharing schedule.

 

Zoo staff raised the cub after her mother started leaving her unattended. Viewing is limited to morning hours.

 

 

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Ohio Water park Closing This Weekend End of Era at Geauga Lake


AURORA, Ohio (AP) — The closing of a northeastern Ohio water park this weekend marks the end of amusement parks at Geauga (jee-AW'-guh) Lake.

 

Wildwater Kingdom in Aurora closes Monday.

 

It's on the site of what was Sea World Ohio and next to where the Geauga Lake amusement park once stood. The site was briefly a Six Flags Worlds of Adventure.

 

Sandusky-based Cedar Fair Entertainment bought the property in 2004. It closed the amusement park three years later, but the water park stayed open until its closing was announced last month.

 

The Plain Dealer in Cleveland reports the site should be attractive to developers and its future is likely to include restaurants, housing and shopping.

 

The only ride left is the Big Dipper wooden roller coaster built in 1925 that's now in disrepair.

 

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Officials to Check 12,000 Gas Pumps for Skimming Devices


HAMILTON, Ohio (AP) — County auditors in Ohio say 12,000 gas pumps will be inspected for skimming devices used to steal credit card information.

 

Gas Pumps

 

At least 30 such devices have been found at gas pumps in a dozen counties since October 2015.

 

The sweep is expected to be conducted at more than 1,500 gas stations over Labor Day weekend. Included in the checks are Butler, Hamilton and Montgomery counties in southwest Ohio, as well as Medina County in northeast Ohio.

 

Officials say customers who pay with plastic cards should use them as credit cards. Debit card PIN numbers are more vulnerable. Cash is the safest option.

 

 

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Filming Underway in Ohio for Movie Starring Bruce Willis

 


GRANVILLE, Ohio (AP) — Filming is underway in central Ohio for an action-thriller starring Bruce Willis.

 

Bruce Willis

 

Willis plays a Granville police chief who is investigating the kidnapping of a young boy in a film called "First Kill."

 

Willis has been seen donning a police uniform at several locations in the suburban Columbus village. He's using a resident's car as a police chief cruiser.

 

A pharmacy has been made to look like a police department. A post office and restaurant also were used in the film.

The crew and cast expect to be in the area for several weeks.

 

The director has said he planned to film in Cincinnati, but moved it to Granville because the southwest Ohio city was too busy.

 

 

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Law Takes Effect Today Scrapping Cap on Alcohol Content for Beer


COLUMBUS, Ohio (AP) — Craft brewers in Ohio now have the freedom to make boozier beers.

 

A new state law takes effect Wednesday, scrapping caps on alcohol content for beer.

 

Ohio is following the lead of other states in getting rid of its 12 percent cap that has been on the books since just after Prohibition.

 

Craft brewers have flinched at anything restricting their ability to be creative and make stronger ales.

 

Legislators say the law levels the playing field and makes Ohio even more attractive to smaller breweries looking to locate to the state.

 

Craft beer is a $22 billion industry in the U.S., and sales were up last year nearly 13 percent over the previous year.

 

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Ohio Court Rules that 'Good Samaritan' Law Covers Non-Medical Help


COLUMBUS, Ohio (AP) — A divided Ohio Supreme Court says the state's good Samaritan law applies to individuals trying to provide non-medical help in emergencies.

 

The court ruled 4-3 Tuesday in favor of a man sued after his unsuccessful efforts to free another man whose leg was pinned between a truck and a loading dock in Fairfield.

 

Dennis Carter lost his leg after Larry Reese, the man trying to help him, inadvertently caused the truck to roll back and crush Carter's leg.

 

Attorneys for Reese said he shouldn't be held liable for the accident because Ohio's good Samaritan law protects people trying to help in such circumstances.

 

Justice Terrence O'Donnell, writing for the majority, says the law applies to anyone providing emergency care or treatment, not just health care professionals.

 

 

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'Believeland' Ohio Corn Mazes Celebrate Cleveland Cavaliers


BRUNSWICK, Ohio (AP) — An Ohio farm is honoring the Cleveland Cavaliers with corn mazes designed in the shape of their championship trophy, LeBron James' head and the words "Homegrown Hero" and "Believeland."

 

Maze

 

Cleveland.com reports that some visitors were to get a preview of the mazes on Friday at Mapleside Farms in Brunswick, about 25 miles southwest of Cleveland.

 

The farm's owner says his three sons suggested the designs for the mazes, which have different degrees of difficulty.

 

The "Believeland" maze is geared toward children and their parents. Others are more advanced.

 

The mazes are set to open to the general public on Sept. 10 as part of Mapleside's fall festival.

 

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Headstone of Civil War Soldier in Ohio To Be Fixed After 154 Years


COLUMBUS, Ohio (AP) — Some mistakes are never too late to fix.

 

A Civil War soldier misidentified when he was buried at an Ohio cemetery more than 150 years ago is to get a new headstone.

 

The Columbus Dispatch reports that Confederate soldier Augustus Beckmann was fatally wounded in the Battle of Shiloh on April 7, 1862. But he was buried at the Camp Chase Confederate Cemetery in Columbus under the wrong name, A. Bergman, and wrong company.

 

Beckmann's brother's great-great-grandson, Greg Beckman, discovered the error when he visited Camp Chase last Memorial Day. He put together the necessary documentation, asked the National Cemetery Administration to fix the headstone, and recently learned his request was approved.

 

An administration spokeswoman says approved stones are typically in place within 60 days.

 

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Ohio Agency Proposes Reform to Unemployment Benefits System


COLUMBUS, Ohio (AP) — A committee of state lawmakers has held its first of five meetings aimed at determining whether Ohio's jobless benefits system for workers is sustainable and whether any solvency issues need to be addressed.

 

The Columbus Dispatch reports the state Department of Job and Family Services warned the panel on Thursday that even a small recession would "render us insolvent."

 

The agency says the state could increase employer taxes, levy a surcharge on businesses or suspend or lower benefit amounts.

 

Other possible changes include lengthening benefit wait periods or shortening the amount of time benefits can be received.

 

The committee of six appointed Republicans and two appointed Democrats was recently created after a bill aimed at resolving the system's challenges stalled.

 

 

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FDA: Listeria Found in Jeni's Splendid Ice Creams Kitchen


COLUMBUS, Ohio (AP) — The Food and Drug Administration says Jeni's Splendid Ice Creams is battling listeria again, a problem that disrupted the company's business last year.

 

The Columbus Dispatch reports  the FDA says in a letter to the company's CEO that the agency found listeria in a production kitchen after two out of 75 swabs taken in January and February came back positive.

 

The FDA says the positive swabs came from prep-room and wash room floors and no listeria was found in the Columbus-based company's products.

 

Jeni's says in a blog post that its products remain free of listeria.

 

Jeni's shut down twice last year after listeria was found in a pint of ice cream in Nebraska and in Jeni's kitchen. A second finding on a kitchen floor occurred later that year.

 

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Driver Dies After Train Hits His SUV at Ohio Rail Crossing

 

WEST CHESTER, Ohio (AP) — Authorities say a man has died after his SUV collided with a train in southwestern Ohio.

 

West Chester Township police say the 70-year-old Liberty Township man died from injuries he suffered Tuesday afternoon at a railroad crossing on state Route 747 in Butler County.

 

Police say he was ejected when the CSX train hit his SUV.

 

It's not clear why the collision occurred. Police say rail crossing gates were functioning properly at the time, and drugs and alcohol weren't factors in the crash.

 

A CSX spokesman says the crash didn't derail the train, which had two locomotives and 34 cars carrying sheet steel products.

 

Spokesman Rob Doolittle says the company extends its sympathies to anyone affected by the collision.

 

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